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South Bronx Community Connections A Pilot Project of Community Connections for Youth: A Grassroots Approach to Pro-social Adolescent Development in a Neighborhood of Chronic Disadvantage: A Formative Evaluation

sbcc_technical_report

Richard Curtis
Anthony Marcus
Nancy Jacobs
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
City University of New York

November 2013

New Paper “Pimping and Profitability Testing the Economics of Trafficking in Street Sex Markets in Atlantic City, New Jersey”

Marcus, A., Sanson, J., Horning, A., Thompson, E., & Curtis, R. (2016). Pimping and Profitability Testing the Economics of Trafficking in Street Sex Markets in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Sociological Perspectives59(1), 46-65.

Human trafficking has been identified as the second or third most profitable illicit business on the planet. Underlying these claims and billions of dollars in policy funding since the 1990s is an economics of human trafficking built heavily on two assumptions. The first is that nonconsensual labor is more profitable than consensual labor with minors being particularly profitable due to their ubiquity and inability to effectively consent. The second is that, unlike illicit narcotic and weapons sales, human trafficking involves a uniquely renewable and nearly limitless source of profit. This article uses empirical data collected from street sex markets in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 2010–2012 to test some of the assumptions of the economics of human trafficking and puts particular focus on U.S.-based domestic minor sex trafficking by exploring market practices and understandings of young sex workers and pimps/third parties who have opportunities to benefit from the sexual labor of minors. Consistent with broader literature by economic historians and labor process scholars, findings do not support the assumptions of trafficking economics, suggesting the need for trafficking economists and policymakers to give more consideration to local political economies of sex in the design of antitrafficking policy.

New Paper “Strength in Numbers: A Model for Undergraduate Research Training and Education in the Social and Behavioral Sciences”

Martin, Y. C., Marcus, A., Curtis, R., Eichenbaum, J., & Drucker, E. (2016). Strength in Numbers: A Model for Undergraduate Research Training and Education in the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Journal of Criminal Justice Education, 1-17.

 

This study describes a new approach to undergraduate science training that offers an alternate model to the national objective of scaling up scientific research interests and capabilities among undergraduate students. With this new focus, we seek to more effectively bring scientific research methods and experiences to larger numbers of students in non-elite educational circumstances. Our model has been designed and implemented, at the John Jay College and the Borough of Manhattan Community College, both of which are part of the City University of New York (CUNY), where we have a majority non-White and economically disadvantaged student body. We have successfully engaged large numbers of undergraduate students by linking multiple classes in the social and behavioral sciences to build collective cross-disciplinary research projects that give every enrolled student an opportunity to receive high-quality research training and create cumulative data sets over years that are cumulative, collaborative, and of professional value.

New Paper “No Love for Children: Reciprocity, Science, and Engagement in the Study of Child Sex Trafficking.”

Marcus, Anthony, and Ric Curtis. “No Love for Children: Reciprocity, Science, and Engagement in the Study of Child Sex Trafficking.” Ethical Concerns in Research on Human Trafficking. Springer International Publishing, 2016. 191-204.

 

Predictors of Police Reporting Among Hispanic Immigrant Victims of Violence — Published in Race and Justice

Predictors of Police Reporting Among Hispanic Immigrant Victims of Violence

Dane Hautala — University of Nebraska (REACH)

Kirk Dombrowski — University of Nebraska (REACH)

Anthony Marcus — John Jay College CUNY (SNRG)

Published in Race and Justice

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of police reporting among
Hispanic immigrant victims of violence. A sample of 127 Hispanic immigrants was
generated through a chain-referral procedure in the city of Hempstead, New York.
Participants were asked about their most recent victimization experiences, and
detailed information was collected on up to three incidents. The analyses were based
on a total of 214 separate victimization incidents, one third of which were reported to
the police. Logistic regression analyses indicated that serious injury, multiple-victim
incidents, and perceptions of discrimination increase the odds of a police report.
Moreover, incidents involving a Black primary assailant were less likely to be reported
to the police than incidents involving an assailant perceived to be of Hispanic origin.
Supplementary analyses suggested that this latter relationship may be contingent upon
the type of crime and the victim’s relationship with the assailant. At the policy level,
these findings call into question assumptions about very recent immigrants being too
socially isolated and distrustful of law enforcement to sustain robust reporting levels,
as well as pointing to encouraging possibilities for productive engagement between
police and Hispanic immigrant populations.